4 Spiritual Benefits of Online Giving

4 Spiritual Benefits of Online Giving

“What’s the deal with the wooden box?” I asked one of the long-time members of the church.

The question was an innocuous attempt to connect with someone. The answer opened my eyes to the historical and spiritual significance of the nondescript wooden box that many churches use to gather offerings. The box dated back to the beginning of the last century, I was told.

Before then, a committee from the church would personally, member by member, request gifts and subscriptions to support the work of the congregation. If you didn’t follow up with the gift you had said you’d make, then you got a knock on your door reminding you of your commitment.

A Better Way

In 1900, the pastor of this church devised a better way. He proposed using this simple wooden box, in which the congregation could simply place their offerings each week. The church lived by faith, rather than compulsion, and the funds placed in the box would be divided by percentage for various ministries in the church. Today, many churches use budgets and offering plates. These contemporary methods of giving are rooted in the history of the old box plan of giving.

New giving methods are once again changing how people contribute to the work of God’s kingdom and, as is usually the case, not everyone thinks this is such a great idea. But change is almost always disruptive. When churches stopped knocking on doors and started putting boxes out, I’m sure there were more than a few who expressed discomfort with and disapproval of the new approach.

Of course, it’s hard to please everyone. Today some believe that the passing of the plates in a worship service has become perfunctory and diminishes the worship experience. And meanwhile, using digital tools for giving raises yet more questions. Does online giving promote individualism and detract from corporate worship? Should churches allow people to give with credit cards, especially given all we know about how some struggle with debt?

Modern Tools Enhance Spirituality

These questions have merit. Overall, however, I believe the spiritual benefits of digital giving outweigh the potential negative impact on a congregation. We can’t go back in time and I doubt it’s a good idea to go back to wooden boxes or—for that matter—requesting pure gold pieces. Churches must consider the practical aspects of a changing culture. We’re a digital society; the church needs to have digital ways of giving.

Though digital giving methods are clearly practical, do they have a spiritual quality to them? In short, yes. Let me give you four spiritual benefits of digital giving.

1. Conviction

The Holy Spirit can convict a person at any time. If someone is convicted about being more generous at 11 PM one Thursday night, online giving makes it easy to give to their local church.

2. Opportunity

Digital giving methods open up more opportunities to give. For example, my brother is planting a church. I am not a member of his church, but I do support his congregation financially. Online giving provides me an opportunity to support his work even though I can’t attend the worship service. Also, digital giving solutions allow me to give to my church on any day of the week, not just Sunday.

3. Prioritization

Have you ever forgotten to bring your checkbook to church? Or perhaps you thought you had more cash on hand than you did. When people use digital giving methods—such as giving to God through the local church as soon as each paycheck gets deposited—they can prioritize their giving. Similarly, a person who forgot to give in worship or who was traveling can catch up on a missed Sunday.

4. Regularity

Giving is an act of worship. It’s also a spiritual discipline. Giving honors God’s glory and requires regular effort. Through the use of automatic deductions, digital giving methods can help a person become more regular in generosity.  

An Issue of the Heart

Though I believe they are noteworthy, I don’t want to overplay the spiritual benefits of digital giving tools. For centuries, the church has used a variety of methods, including wooden boxes. Giving is—ultimately—a heart issue. Whether you write a check, create an automatic debit, or use an online giving platform, God honors the generosity of a cheerful giver. Of course, you may also be glad the church clerk doesn’t come knocking on your door demanding money like in the past!

Sam Rainer
Sam Rainer

Sam S. Rainer III serves as president of Rainer Research and as co-founder of Rainer Publishing. Sam is the author of Obstacles in the Established Church and the co-author of Essential Church. He has written hundreds of articles for several publications. He is a frequent speaker on church health issues. You can connect with Sam at his blog, samrainer.com.