The Summit One Day: Your Day to Level Up Has Come

The Summit One Day: Your Day to Level Up Has Come

Your work matters. All work matters. But your work in the local church is especially critical.

When you do what you do well, your church will feed the hungry, engage the lonely, and give hope to the hopeless.

Your community will be transformed.

Eternities will be impacted.

You must do what you do well. You must level up.

Maybe you’re a senior leader who wants to reach the back row of the church. Maybe you’re an executive pastor looking for new strategies to help your church run more efficiently. Maybe you’re a communications leader who is tired of your messages bouncing off people in the community.

You keep telling yourself, “One day, I’ll get the training I need. When the pace of ministry slows down, I’ll sign up for that class. When my family responsibilities subside, I’ll register for that conference.”

But we both know, “one day” never arrives.

It’s just a way for you to procrastinate. And it’s deadly for your ministry.

Why Do We Procrastinate?

Psychologists have been trying to pin down the origin of procrastination for years. It’s no easy task, but Elliot Berkman suggests we procrastinate when “the value of doing something else outweighs the value of working now.”

In other words, in the moment, you believe it’s more valuable for you to spin your wheels rather than take the step you need to level up your skills.

You could have a myriad of reasons why you’re delaying action:

  • Maybe you’ve failed to put a deadline on yourself so the task has become largely abstract in your mind.
  • Maybe you’re not really sure what the next step is. Vagueness often gives birth to procrastination.
  • Maybe you feel inadequate to take the step.
  • Maybe the step appears too difficult. (You figure you’ll never find the money or the time to get the training.)

The Consequences of Procrastination

Procrastination has consequences. You teach others that, but do you stop and think about the impact your own procrastination has on your ministry?
Take, for example, these three important consequences:

1. You’ll Set a Bad Example

You’re a leader. No matter what role you have in the church, people are looking at you as an example. When you procrastinate on much-needed training, you encourage others to pause their own growth. If you don’t need to grow, why do they?   

2. You’ll Miss Opportunities

Your time is limited. You won’t be on this planet forever. Your opportunities are finite. Miss them once and you may not get another shot. You may have an opportunity to use the training you need next week or next year. If you put it off, you’ll miss it.

It’s not just about you, either. The most important opportunities for your ministry will impact other people. You’ll reach new people. You’ll meet crucial needs for others. You’ll extend the work of your church into new places.

Or you won’t.

But what if you’re ready for that opportunity? What if, as you take your next step in training soon, you’ll be ready for whatever comes your way? Who will be helped tomorrow because you stopped procrastinating today?

3. You’ll Ruin Momentum

Momentum requires growth. You are not prepared for the challenges of tomorrow. You simply aren’t. What’s thriving in your ministry right now won’t continue to thrive without growth.

As you invest in your church’s future growth, you’ll ensure you can continue to move forward despite the inevitable changes in your community.

Sure, one day you’ll get around to it. One day, you’ll get the training you need. One day, when the opportunity cost of not getting the training gets bigger than the cost of taking the necessary steps, you’ll do it.

But what will be the cost of waiting for that day?

You may never know.

Your One Day Is Here

What if your one day could truly come in one day?

You shouldn’t have to clear a week on your schedule to truly level up.

That’s why Pushpay created the Summit One Day. It’s designed for busy church leaders who are tired of saying they’ll get to more training one day.

You’ll find great church conferences out there designed to inspire you. By the time the week ends, you’re ready to run through a wall. Maybe you need conferences like that from time to time.

But that’s not Summit One Day.

You see, Summit One Day isn’t for everyone. If you’re content with the ministry skills you have right now and you just need more motivation, this conference isn’t for you. If you’re looking for a sermon and a song, this is not your conference.

Summit One Day is for church leaders who want to level up their skills right away.

Hosted at McGlohon Theatre (Elevation Church’s Uptown location) in Charlotte, NC, Summit One Day equips you to do your work more effectively. Whether you’re in leadership, operations, communications, technology, or finance, you’ll get the skills you need to help your ministry grow during this conference.

Erwin Raphael McManus (Founding and lead Pastor of Mosaic Church in Los Angeles), Nona Jones (Faith-Based Partnerships Leader at Facebook), Scott Harrison (Founder and CEO of charity: water) and Pastor Steven Furtick (Founding and Lead Pastor of Elevation Church) will be there.

You’ll get communications insights from the business world in the context of the church.

You’ll find hard-to-get technology insights that you understand without an engineering degree.

You’ll learn more about how leadership in the church has changed in the last decade.

And you’ll get all of that training in just a day.

Just one day…

It’s time to celebrate. Your ONE DAY has finally come.

Tobin Perry
Writer at Pushpay | tobin@tobinperry.com |

Tobin Perry has been a writer and editor in Christian media for almost 20 years. He has worked for the North American Mission Board, Saddleback Church and the International Mission Board in a variety of editorial capacities. An ordained minister, he has also served as a lead pastor at a church in Southern Indiana. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism and Gateway Seminary. Tobin currently lives in Evansville, IN with his wife, Charissa, and three children.